Archive

Archive for the ‘Blogging’ Category

Invisibility Doesn’t Sell

September 3, 2012 7 comments

The best time to start promoting your book is three years before it comes out. ~ Seth Godin

Tweet this!

There are some in the writing industry that have done more than make it work. They have thrived. When they come up with recommendations, we should pay attention.

I recently read a guest post by Seth Godin. Seth is one such man. He knows how to write and he knows how to market. We should sit up and listen.

Granted, just because something worked for him doesn’t guarantee that it will work for you or me, but we would be wise to study the model. 

Let’s repeat the model: “The best time to start promoting your book is three years before it comes out.”

I can hear it now. — Three years? You have got to be kidding? Three years is a long time. Three years can feel like an eternity. And how do your promote what you haven’t even written yet? How do you even know you’ll be publishing a book three years from now? — I hear you, because you’re echoing my thoughts.

But it’s good to take your own advice. So I sat back, read on, and listened to what Seth was honing in on. The full quote is as follows:

The best time to start promoting your book is three years before it comes out. Three years to build a reputation, build a permission asset, build a blog, build a following, build credibility and build the connections you’ll need later. ~ Seth Godin

It’s not necessarily about promoting just that one book.

It’s about building connections.

It’s about building a platform.

It’s about building credibility. 

Gone are the days when one can hide behind a pen name and still sell books. Invisibility doesn’t sell. Promotion without credibility doesn’t sell either. 

Anyone can tweet a promotion. Anyone can promote on Facebook. It takes but seconds to do either. 

What takes time is building relationships, trust, and credibility. 

Remember: Invisibility doesn’t sell!
Tweet this!

Shaking hands symbol

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We need to spend time in the proving ground. We need to prove that we can write, that we have a message or tale worth sharing—and that we care more about people than a sale. 

We need to earn the right to promote. Earn people’s trust, earn their loyalty, and then we will have earned permission to promote.

Maybe I did it all wrong. Maybe you did it all wrong. But it’s never too late to change. We can quit kicking ourselves. We can get to work and make the changes. And, hopefully, one day we’ll write a post on how thankful we are that we heeded Seth’s advice!

Related articles:


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Rosie Cochran

I am a pastor’s wife, former missionary, mother of four great sons, and author of three Christian suspense novels: Betrayed, Identity Revealed, and A Murder Unseen. (Available at: Amazon.com.) I have a passion for God, my family, and writing! If you want to connect with me, join me on Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Pinterest.  Interested in updates by email? CLICK HERE!

Have a question? Email Me!

Advertisements

HTML Code: “Tweet This!”

August 17, 2012 9 comments

Never become so much of an expert that you stop gaining expertise.
View life as a continuous learning experience.
~ Denis Waitley
Tweet this!

Always ready to learn new things, I find myself studying what I like and don’t like on blogs and websites. One of the things I like is the “Tweet this!” feature. They give a great quote. I love the quote. I want to tweet it, and voila!, they have a “Tweet this!” link all ready for me. Very cool.

So cool and techie that I wanted it. But how? How did they do it? Come to find out, it’s pretty basic HTML coding. If you’re even a bit familiar with typing in code, this won’t be a problem at all. You can copy, paste, and substitute your own text. Are you ready? Here we go!

THE CODE:

TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET Tweet this!

THE FOUR PARTS:

Part One:  TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET

This is where you’ll substitute whatever it is you want to. In the example that follows, I’m going to substitute in: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost

Part Two: 

This will stay the same every time. The  code is the link that will direct you to Twitter to sign in and then send this tweet.

Part Three:  TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET via@YOUR-TWITTER-ACCOUNT “

Yes, you really are going to type right here what you want to tweet. This can vary from the actual words you typed in under PART ONE, but be sure you’re not changing it so much that the one tweeting it thinks you’re tricking them! In the example that follows, I’m going to substitute in: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

via @YOUR-TWITTER-ACCOUNT

I put my Twitter handle in there. You can sub in YOUR twitter handle—or you can leave this part off completely. Just be sure that at the end of this part that you don’t fail to keep the quote (  ) in there! Leaving it out will cause the HTML code to fail.

Part Four:  target=”_blank”>

I use the _blank target as this opens up Twitter on a new webpage in order to send the tweet. That means that after you’ve closed out from sending the tweet, my webpage should still be open in front of you. Yes, if we’re wanting traffic to our site, we don’t want people distracted and directed completely away from our website!

EXAMPLES:

The CODE with the example inserted…
(This would be under the TEXT tab in WordPress.com, where you type HTML code.)

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost Tweet this!

…as it appears on the on the blog or webpage…
(This is how it would also appear under the VISUAL tab in WordPress.com.)

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost Tweet this!

…and as it appears as a TWEET.

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

DRESSING IT UP:

Of course, once it’s done, you can center it, put it in a quote box, or whatever you want to do. See what I’ve done below!

“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.
No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.”
~ Robert Frost
Tweet this!

WHEN THINGS DON’T GO AS THEY SHOULD…

If you type in the code, but it mostly disappears when you save it, it’s a sure sign that you’re omitting or adding something that you can’t. Type it again and compare it with the example under THE CODE. Some common errors are:

1) Omitting the quotation marks or carats.

2) Using quotation marks around the quote within the HTML code. The problem is that quotation marks are code and can only be used as required for the HTML coding.

For example, under PART THREE, type the following: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

Do NOT type in the following quotation marks: “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

A lengthy explanation? Yes, it has become that. I trust that in short order you’ll be coding “Tweet this!” quickly and accurately!


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Rosie Cochran

I’m a mother of four great sons. I’m a widow who has transitioned back into full-time missions with NTM as a staff writer in their communications department. I’m also an author of three Christian suspense novels: BetrayedIdentity Revealed, and A Murder Unseen. (Available at: Amazon.com.) Greater than that, I am a child of God with a passion for God, my family, and writing! If you want to connect with me, join me on TwitterFacebookGoodreads, and Pinterest. Interested in updates by email? CLICK HERE!

Have a question? Email Me!

Fractured to Full

March 21, 2012 4 comments

Most people have no idea of the giant capacity we can immediately command when we focus all of our resources on mastering a single area of our lives.

                                                        — Tony Robbins

My sister posted this quote. My response went like this:

“And when does this illusive day come when I can focus all of my resources on mastering a single area of my life?”

The concept itself? I agreed with it. Wholeheartedly.

If I could take all my energy, all my resources, and focus them on one area? I could see how mastery could come.

But that’s not life. At least not my life. (And I’ve a sneaky suspicion that it’s not yours either!)

Picnic plate full of assorted food.

Image via Wikipedia (Public Domain)

There are too many things on my plate. Too many areas over which to scatter my limited resources and energy. It is all too fractured.

The areas of responsibility seem to increase; my energy seems to decrease. (You’re relating to this, right? Please confirm that I am not alone in this!)

But back to my sister and the quote. My sister can be quite wise. That’s a good thing. Of course, maybe I shouldn’t admit that too loudly or I may never hear the end of it. Hmm…. Is posting it on a blog too loud?

She also has no problem disagreeing with me. And that is also a good thing! She was ready to challenge my thinking on this quote. We all need that. To have our thinking challenged. I had to rethink how I viewed the quote.

Pie chart of Campania's area Italiano: Grafico...

Pie chart (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Public Domain

Our lives are complex with many parts that make up the whole. Multiple responsibilities that reach for our time and energy do not mean we are living fractured lives. We can view the fractured areas as parts of a whole.

Our lives would be imbalanced if all of our resources, all of the time, were focused on one single area. Other things would suffer. Other things would fail. But one thing at a time? That works!

At any given time, we can funnel our energy and resources into one area of our lives, thus achieving mastery over the long haul in a given area.

Maybe it’s blogging. Maybe you want to master the art of blogging. You know you can’t give up your job to do it. You can’t sacrifice each evening that you would normally devote to your family. You can’t stop sleeping. But you want to master blogging. Or maybe it’s playing the piano—or running a marathon.

Then do it. But in increments. Devote time to it. Designate it a place in your schedule. If you can’t do it daily, at least do it consistently. But recognize and accept the limitations of time and space. 

When you’re doing it, give yourself wholeheartedly to it. Pour your resources, your energy, and your very being into it. Be focused.

It’s not about living half-hearted, fractured lives. It’s about living life to its fullest every day—in each distinct area of our lives. It’s about taking what may appear fractured—and making it a viable part of the whole.

QUESTIONS: How do you master each area of your life? How do you make it work? I would love to hear your thoughts in the comment section!


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Rosie Cochran

I am a pastor’s wife, former missionary, mother of four great sons, and author of three books: Betrayed, Identity Revealed, and A Murder Unseen. (Available at: Amazon.com.) I have a passion for God, my family, and writing! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

Have a question? Email Me!

Building Your Tribe

March 14, 2012 10 comments

There’s been a lot of talk in social media about building your tribe.

Social media may be a current trend, but building a tribe? Tribes have been around for years. If we want to know how to build a tribe, shouldn’t we defer to the experts?

Journey with me as I fall back on personal experience. As a missionary of 20 years, I’ve had the privilege of watching how a tribal chief in the Amazon jungle kept his tribe intact, how he wooed people to follow his lead, and how he caused them to want to listen. Let’s learn by example.

He listened. 

Our tribal chief spent a good part of every day socializing with the villagers, discovering their needs and wants, and making them feel valued. He wasn’t just a leader, but a friend. He knew how to talk—but he also knew how to listen.

He persevered.

There were the “renegades” of the village. When the villagers went to cut gardens, the renegades made boats. When the villagers were roofing a house, the renegades were cutting gardens. When the whole village built boats together, the renegades would be roofing a house. The renegades made it clear they were never really going to be part of the tribe. Our tribal chief knew not to waste his breath with them; he knew not to be consumed by their opposition. He persevered.

He earned the right to be heard.

By genuinely caring. Our tribal chief didn’t just say he cared. He showed he cared. He looked out for the good of the people. He protected them.

By giving. The widows and fatherless of the tribe knew they had an advocate in their chief. They knew he would find ways to be sure they were provided for. Many times that meant he was at my door seeking “donations,” but what better reason can you give than looking after the widows and the fatherless? 

He earned the right to be heard through caring and giving.

His message was relevant.

When he did spoke, his message was relevant because he knew…

…the issues of his tribe…

…the needs of his tribe…

…and the heart of his tribe.

Doesn’t that sound like everything we’ve heard over and over again?

●  We need to listen.

●  We need to earn the right to be heard.

●  We need to give something back.

●  We need to have a relevant message.

●  And we need to persevere, to press on.

There really is nothing new under the sun. 

Isn’t it kind of cool that, in our technologically advanced society, we can still learn from those living without electricity, without running water, and with limited access to the outside world?

What type of tribal chief are we emulating?

●  Are we listening?

●  Are we caring about others?

●  Are we giving back to others?

●  Are we earning the right to be heard?

●  Are we giving a relevant message?

●  And are we pressing on?

Any thoughts to share? Practical tips? Personal experiences with this? I would love to hear!


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Rosie Cochran

I am a pastor’s wife, former missionary, mother of four great sons, and author of three books: Betrayed, Identity Revealed, and A Murder Unseen. (Available at: Amazon.com.) I have a passion for God, my family, and writing! Follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

Have a question? Email Me!

The Liberty to Be Unique

February 21, 2012 3 comments

In a world full of choices, the way you stand out is by not adding to the noise but by exposing your uniqueness.

Jeff Goins

The Liberty Bell in 1872

Image via Wikipedia (Public Domain)

The liberty to be unique.
The liberty to be quirky.
The liberty to be who we are.
We need to embrace that liberty!

Too often we spend our lives trying to fit in. We try to be someone who fits the status quo. We try to be Elastic Woman from the animated movie The Incredibles, adjusting our lives in a series of mind-boggling twists, turns—and sometimes knots. But we’re not Elastic Woman—or Mr. Fantastic, from The Fantastic Four, for the men reading this!

We know this doesn’t work in life. It especially doesn’t work in social media. If it’s the same old, same old? No doubt about it. It will be overlooked.

If we hope to stand out, if we hope to be heard, we cannot hide behind the opinions of others. We cannot simply parrot what we’ve read. We can’t stretch, twist, and recoil to follow the masses.

We must develop our own voice—our own opinions. We must risk exposing ourselves, exposing what we really think, and exposing our uniqueness.

There is a downside. The liberty to be unique comes with risks. There is risk with exposure—the risk of becoming vulnerable. But if we want our writing (and anything else, for that matter!) to make a difference, shouldn’t vulnerability be a risk we are willing to take? Are we ready? Are we ready to embrace our uniqueness? Are we ready to risk vulnerability? Are we ready to make a difference?

It’s All About Readers!

October 18, 2011 3 comments

I wrote a guest post for “Morgen Bailey’s Writing Blog” which was posted today. I based it off of a similar post I wrote for my blog here a few months back, but rewrote it to give tribute to the readers of this world. Where would writers be without readers? We need readers! Click the link below to read the post. While you’re there, check out Morgen’s other posts. She has interviewed many authors, yours truly included. I was Interview #134 and I know she has continued on interviewing authors since then!

Check out:
“It’s All About Readers!”

Categories: Blogging Tags:

4 Steps to Remove the Share and/or Like Features

September 15, 2011 3 comments

On your WordPress blog, there may be times you don’t want the SHARE THIS or LIKE feature to be visible on your blog.

Please note that POSTS have both the SHARE THIS and LIKE features, whereas PAGES only have the SHARE THIS feature.

Here’s how to remove these features:

1. Go to the Dashboard, then click on PAGES or POSTS in the left-hand column.

2. Click on EDIT under the name of the PAGE or POST for which you wish to remove the SHARE THIS and/or LIKE feature.

3. Scroll to the bottom of the screen below the document box and follow the directions below for either a PAGE or a POST.

  • For a POST, scroll to the LIKES AND SHARES heading. There will be the following two checkboxes: (1) show likes on this post; and, (2) show sharing buttons on this post. Remove the check-mark from one or both of the boxes.
  • For a PAGE, scroll to the SHARING heading. Under the header there will be a checkbox beside “Show sharing buttons on this post.” Remove the check-mark from the checkbox.

4. Click the UPDATE button in the left-hand column under the PUBLISH heading.

Congratulations! Now you can go to that PAGE or POST and see that the SHARE THIS and/or LIKE features have been removed. Repeat the process for each individual page or post.

%d bloggers like this: