Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Social network’

HTML Code: “Tweet This!”

August 17, 2012 2 comments

Never become so much of an expert that you stop gaining expertise.
View life as a continuous learning experience.
~ Denis Waitley
Tweet this!

Always ready to learn new things, I find myself studying what I like and don’t like on blogs and websites. One of the things I like is the “Tweet this!” feature. They give a great quote. I love the quote. I want to tweet it, and voila!, they have a “Tweet this!” link all ready for me. Very cool.

So cool and techie that I wanted it. But how? How did they do it? Come to find out, it’s pretty basic HTML coding. If you’re even a bit familiar with typing in code, this won’t be a problem at all. You can copy, paste, and substitute your own text. Are you ready? Here we go!

THE CODE:

TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET <a href=”http://twitter.com/home/?status= TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET via @YOUR-TWITTER-ACCOUNT ” target=”_blank”> Tweet this!</a>

THE FOUR PARTS:

Part One:  TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET

This is where you’ll substitute whatever it is you want to. In the example that follows, I’m going to substitute in: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost

Part Two:  <a href=”http://twitter.com/home/?status=

This will stay the same every time. The <a href=”http://twitter.com/home/?status= code is the link that will direct you to Twitter to sign in and then send this tweet.

Part Three:  TYPE HERE WHAT YOU WANT TO TWEET via@YOUR-TWITTER-ACCOUNT “

Yes, you really are going to type right here what you want to tweet. This can vary from the actual words you typed in under PART ONE, but be sure you’re not changing it so much that the one tweeting it thinks you’re tricking them! In the example that follows, I’m going to substitute in: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

via @YOUR-TWITTER-ACCOUNT

I put my Twitter handle in there. You can sub in YOUR twitter handle—or you can leave this part off completely. Just be sure that at the end of this part that you don’t fail to keep the quote (  ) in there! Leaving it out will cause the HTML code to fail.

Part Four:  target=”_blank”>

I use the _blank target as this opens up Twitter on a new webpage in order to send the tweet. That means that after you’ve closed out from sending the tweet, my webpage should still be open in front of you. Yes, if we’re wanting traffic to our site, we don’t want people distracted and directed completely away from our website!

EXAMPLES:

The CODE with the example inserted…
(This would be under the TEXT tab in WordPress.com, where you type HTML code.)

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost <a href=”http://twitter.com/home/?status=No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran” target=”_blank”>Tweet this!</a>

…as it appears on the on the blog or webpage…
(This is how it would also appear under the VISUAL tab in WordPress.com.)

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost Tweet this!

…and as it appears as a TWEET.

No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

DRESSING IT UP:

Of course, once it’s done, you can center it, put it in a quote box, or whatever you want to do. See what I’ve done below!

“No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.
No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.”
~ Robert Frost
Tweet this!

WHEN THINGS DON’T GO AS THEY SHOULD…

If you type in the code, but it mostly disappears when you save it, it’s a sure sign that you’re omitting or adding something that you can’t. Type it again and compare it with the example under THE CODE. Some common errors are:

1) Omitting the quotation marks or carats.

2) Using quotation marks around the quote within the HTML code. The problem is that quotation marks are code and can only be used as required for the HTML coding.

For example, under PART THREE, type the following: No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader. ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

Do NOT type in the following quotation marks: “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” ~ Robert Frost via @RosieCochran

A lengthy explanation? Yes, it has become that. I trust that in short order you’ll be coding “Tweet this!” quickly and accurately!


ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Rosie Cochran

I am a pastor’s wife, former missionary, mother of four great sons, and author of three Christian suspense novels: Betrayed, Identity Revealed, and A Murder Unseen. (Available at: Amazon.com.) I have a passion for God, my family, and writing! If you want to connect with me, join me on Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Pinterest.  Interested in updates by email? CLICK HERE!

Have a question? Email Me!

Integrity in Social Media

February 15, 2012 16 comments
English: Silhouette of three books

There have been several articles I’ve read recently that have brought validation to some thoughts that have been bouncing around in my mind. It’s about integrity in social media.

As we speak of integrity in social media, I think it’s a lot about integrity to who we are—and who people know us to be.

Some people can sell/promote anything. We know it. We sift through what they are selling/promoting for what is relevant to us, and that’s fine. They are being true to themselves.

But what if we don’t fall into that category? Are we being true to who we are? Are we being true to who people know us to be? Are we presenting who we really are on social media?

Are we “LIKING” this and that because we really “LIKE”  it—or is there a lot of social networking peer pressure coming into play?

This whole social media is a learning experience. I, for one, have tried different things, but in the end, sometimes it’s just not “me.” I keep coming back to being true to who I am.

If I wouldn’t normally suggest a book, blog, or video clip to my friend sitting next to me, why would I promote it to the whole world of Twitter or Facebook?

If I wouldn’t normally suggest anything I haven’t read, if I wouldn’t normally suggest something I couldn’t vouch for, why promote it on Twitter? On Facebook?

Unless, of course, a track record has been established.

We’ve all had authors whose books have hooked us. We buy the next one, barely stopping to read the synopsis on the back cover.

We may promote an author because we have read their blogs. We know they can write. We’ve seen it! We’ve read their work. So we promote them. We’re promoting the writer we’ve come to know.

Sometimes I promote an author’s blog, but not their books.—Weird? Not really. They are writers. They are great writers. Their blogs are awesome. But their books? Sometimes it’s obvious that the content lands far beyond my conservative Christian threshold. I’ve no doubt the quality of craft is there, but I know I wouldn’t be true to myself if I recommended a book that fell outside my realm of comfort, outside my belief system. So I don’t, even though I can still applaud their ability, even though I can still promote their blogs.

We may even promote an editor we’ve never used.— I have! Of course, I admitted that I hadn’t personally used the editor, but she had won me over. I had followed her blog. I had seen the proper use of grammar in her own writing. Through mutual online groups, I saw an honesty and work ethic that impressed me. She made it to my list of editors to use—and so I recommended her.

All that being said, recognize the fact that if I’m tweeting, blogging, or face-booking about a book, blog, or video trailer, that’s a good thing. It’s because someone I have connected with is behind the product—and I’m impressed. Impressed enough to tweet it! Impressed enough to promote it!

And if I’m not tweeting about it? It might just be that I haven’t yet had time to read or watch it!

I’m not saying we need to conduct an in-depth investigation into every tweet we make, but I do suggest we strive to be true to who we are, to stop and think before we tweet, before we post, and before we blog. Let’s be sure we’re being true to who we are.

Integrity to who we are. I think that’s important. Any thoughts?


5 Steps to Adjusting Your Facebook Thumbnail Picture!

July 5, 2011 2 comments

Are you frustrated that your Facebook Thumbnail Picture is imbalanced, askew, and not displaying what you really want it to display? Making the most of the thumbnail version of your Profile Picture isn’t hard. Follow the five steps below to adjust what is visible:

1) At the top right-hand side of the screen under ACCOUNT, click on EDIT PAGE.

2) In the left-hand column, click on PROFILE PICTURE.

3) Click on EDIT THUMBNAIL underneath the profile picture shown.

4) At the EDIT THUMBNAIL pop-up box, move your cursor over the THUMBNAIL PICTURE, then click and hold the left mouse button down as you move what is shown in the THUMBNAIL BOX until the portion you prefer to see is visible. See the before and after example below.

5) Click on SAVE!

%d bloggers like this: